• Blue Jean Queen - Wild Wild Woman

    New Music – Blue Jean Queen Explodes Our Hearts With “Wild Wild Woman”

    Between Stevie Nicks on "Edge of Seventeen" and Deana Carter with "Strawberry Wine," now there is an equal which somehow manages to draw comparisons to both at the same time. "Wild Wild Woman" is powerful, perfect, and rises into the realm of greatness by transcending forever beyond the person who created it to represent a moment forever speaking to whoever hears it as one of the great beacons of the realized rare potential music has the heights of reaching.

  • Welcome To Our Hearts Haze County

    Welcome To Our Hearts Haze County by Jay Armstrong I am in love with Haze County. These first songs are a selfish organic release of compounded layered expression yet speak to the ALL our individual spirits gravitate towards. Haze County breathes through frantic frenzied technique blurred beneath a rare sensitivity towards the bigger cohesive whole. Certainly this is yet another band on the path of Bryan Leslie Roberts creativity yet the stand alone, above, beyond, nature of this project’s first few songs overshadow all which he had his hands in before. What is the point in reflecting on each band and step leading Roberts here when such reflection would take…

  • Lou Rebecca’s “Tonight”

      Simultaneously an emblem of the past and a curtain drawn open towards the future, Lou Rebecca’s uncanny pop sensibilities are a powerhouse to be reckoned with. With her delicate, silky voice enticing you in both English and her native French, Lou’s inherent knack for captivating performances and choreography have immediately won over audiences in the synth scene for the last several years. Released last week on Austin, Texas’ Holodeck Records, Lou’s long awaited self-titled debut encompasses infectious pop-ballads and dreamy dance anthems to conjure the romantic in all of us. Her self-directed music video for the first track off her EP, “Tonight”, stars both Lou and Ramesh Srivastava (frontman…

  • Live Review: The Besnard Lakes Are A Vast Wonder Unto Their Own by Trish Connelly/Raphael Umscheid

    Website || Facebook || Twitter || Instagram   Photography by Raphael Umscheid ( Instagram ) Words by Trish Connelly ( Instagram )   Arriving early for The Besnard Lakes’ set in downtown Austin, Barracuda’s inside stage provided a spacious yet intimate environment for attendees to plant themselves up close for the band’s eagerly awaited set after their last designated date in the city was cancelled (due to their vehicle getting damaged after a snowstorm and hitting a deer). Opening with dialogue that embraced the ethereal and wondrous nature of their name, The Besnard Lakes delved into “Pressure of Our Plans” to a cheering and spirited crowd. Exuding harmonious melodies from…

  • Standing in the Gap: The Disquiet Vol. 1 Compilation by Jason Lamoreaux

    “In violent times, you shouldn’t have to sell your soul” ~ Tears for Fears (Ian Stanley/Ronald Orzabal) “ Shout”, Songs from the Big Chair 1985   This quote from 1985 is rather poignant in today’s political climate. As the rights of women, the LGBTQ community, people of color, scholars, the dispossessed, and those who resist are under attack by our own government, art becomes a medium in which expressions of rage, consolation, resistance, solidarity, sadness, and hope can be expressed. These artistic expressions are not passive, they are not void of meaning nor are they empty. They are a means to join in, to evoke, and to mobilize those who…

  • New Music Video: Sun Abduction – “Acid Pyramid”

    Facebook || Twitter || Instagram   A gracious addition to the psychedelic rock scene, Brooklyn-based quartet Sun Abduction are bound for a west coast tour in anticipation of their recently released singles, “Acid Pyramid / Pale Rider”, as well as prepping for their upcoming debut LP. Directed by Robert Hickerman, their music video for “Acid Pyramid” offers a glimpse of the track’s foreboding doom through a bystander’s view of far-off window panes and the quick flickering of neon-hued lighting within the mysterious room. Without pause, the track pulsates with visions of agitated and idly pacing blood-soaked Converse sneakers amidst a kaleidoscopic wash of reds and oranges, shifting between hazy lo-fi…

  • Photography: Angel Olsen at The Mohawk

    Photography by Ismael Quintanilla III   This past Tuesday we managed to pull some strings in order to see the (second) sold out Angel Olsen show at the Mohawk in Austin, Texas. Everybody’s been gushing about her latest album, My Woman, as well as her live performances. So naturally we had to see what all of the buzz was about. What we experienced was honestly something like no other – a truly impeccable live performance.. Her voice was like the lovechild of Gwen Stefani and Loretta Lynn, a sweet mixture you never really thought you needed until now. She brings a bit of grungy lo-fi with tasty twang to her songs, creating…

  • A Daydream From Another Planet: River Jones’ Official Music Video For “Pure”

      Collaborative chance encounters are always thriving in the city of Austin, Texas. Back in June, River Jones partnered with local indie pop band Tele Novella for a music video shoot they had scheduled and just so happened to meet Lorelei Linklater, director Richard Linklater’s daughter. Both Jones and Linklater spent the day decked out in blue makeup and alien costumes and the two artists stuck up an undeniable friendship. During a road trip to Dallas singing along to Elliott Smith, the duo decided to collaborate on Jones’ music video for “Pure”, a track he had written days before meeting Lorelei. Within a week the video was recorded and features…

  • Scatter Factory LP Blends Motorik Electronica With Ambient Bliss

      When I first heard the name Scatter Factory, the thought that immediately popped into my head is something or someone churning out produce in an uncoordinated not well-thought- out manner. However, the debut album from Scatter Factory (real name Will Foster) is anything but that – it’s calculated, intentional, sincere, and meticulously constructed (like blocks made of different high quality materials). It’s ironic that the lead track from this album should be named ‘Out The Blocks’, but there you have it.   Scatter Factory by Scatter Factory   Scatter Factory also gives the association of seeds being scattered to the wind. In this case, sonic seeds that have, thanks…

  • Maija Sofia’s “Stains” is a Beautiful Reflection on Transitory States

      Maija Sofia isn’t one to let go of her artistic reins — her single “Stains” off her debut EP The Sugar Sea was self-written, recorded and produced and Sofia also took command in directing her music video. The Dublin-based indie folk songstress captured the track’s solemn mood on a foggy and dreary day by the beach with chairs set out for two but only one of them occupied. “Stains” oscillates between ambivalence and certainty, wishing to forget mistakes made, hesitant to immerse herself entirely yet just as quickly plunging back towards investing her whole being to her lover (“I’d give you my whole world, have everything“). Her waves of…

  • I Do Music for Ghost Stories: John Carpenter at ACL Live’s Moody Theater

    Words: Trish Connelly ( Instagram ) Photography: Raphael Umscheid ( Instagram)   Despite wishing I had the opportunity to squeeze in a John Carpenter movie marathon before Thursday evening at ACL Live’s Moody Theater, it didn’t prevent me from sitting upright in my seat, absolutely spellbound at Carpenter’s genius to create ominous and memorable compositions across the entire forty year span of his career.     John Carpenter’s show opened up with Escape From New York’s main title, eliciting cheers and excitement from the audience that remained consistent throughout his near hour and a half set. Joining him onstage included the backup band for Tenacious D, as well as his…

  • Pookie and the Poodlez – Young Adult

    Living in Oakland there might seem to be far more bands than necessary swinging from the same complacent rock ‘n’ roll vine, for the rest of us around the world though, our thirst cannot be quenched for the talent and sound that area consistently offers up to us. Pookie and the Poodlez has remained strictly in the peripheral for a significant amount of time now, somehow more by proxy than by personal experience Trevor Straub has been a part of our collective awareness, be it through making noise with Nobunny to just being attached to rad bills at our favorite spots over and over again, his presence on and off…

  • Technicolor Hearts’ “Would You Come Back to Me?”

      Austin presents a warm home to creative electric dream-pop darlings Technicolor Hearts. Comprised of songwriter and vocalist Naomi Cherie and multi-instrumentalist Joseph Salazar, Technicolor Hearts knows how to weave soaring soundscapes and dazzling imagery into their music videos, as shown in their most recent “Would You Come Back to Me?”. Their video has a psychedelic 70’s feel to it, warping imagery and neon colors together in a blended and dazzling affair. The lyrics are subtle, with the main spotlight being on Cherie’s delicate and ethereal vocals and Salazar’s guitar solo intensifying the track mid-way through. Completing the video within a single night, the duo went for a more artistic…

  • When the Beach Boys Say Forever, They Mean FOREVER: Still America’s Greatest Rock ‘n’ Roll Band 50 Years Later

    Words by: Merri Palmer Photographer: Ismael Quintanilla III   I thought I knew what rock ‘n’ roll was until I saw The Beach Boys. My generation grew up on Beach Boys’ surf rock, a sound so familiar and quintessential to American life that it may as well have been baseball, or apple pie, or stars and stripes. I have a sharp childhood memory of singing “Barbara Ann” at the top of my lungs in a restaurant bathroom. As those harmonies eked through the raspy speakers and into my soul, I knew this was music. As I grew older, friends got into boy bands and pop, hip-hop and metal. I felt…

  • An Evening with Low at The Parish

    Words by: Trish Connelly Photography: Raphael Umscheid   Despite my belated discovery of Low’s music, their album Things We Lost in the Fire defined a significant portion of my college years. More often than not I’d put “Sunflower” and “Dinosaur Act” on repeat, the soundtrack to my solitary Sunday nights. This past Tuesday, I found myself front and center for their An Evening With show at The Parish in Austin, Texas. A hush ran through the crowd as soon as they graced the stage, guitarist and vocalist Sparhawk’s voice blending effortlessly and magnificently with drummer Mimi Parker’s falsetto. Throughout the first half of their set the band played audience favorites…

  • Persistence Pays: The Rich Hands

      Finally moving out of the shadows of Black Lips and The Bad Lovers, stepping off in their own definitive direction, The Rich Hands are all grown up and killin’ it better than ever.   There is always a timidness when you play something from a band you have been geeking over for so long and immediately notice a change, especially as drastically different from what we have come to love and expect from these dudes, but when it is as solid and spot on as this first batch of songs what else can we do but appreciate what they gave us before and revel in the damn fine ride…

  • Holy Wave: The Evil Has Landed Part II

    Holy Wave: The Evil Has Landed Part 2 In a world of faux social connection bands rise out of hype to show no substance once fully in the light. In this moment of no tolerance for giants, where longevity and ego are despicable to nearly all, bands get discarded before coming close to catching stride as soon as the crowd stops looking like a carbon-copy collective of friends. No one has the time to argue the merits of our broken system, we walk this path acutely aware of the double-standards we rally behind; yes we agree that nearly everything we have loved has eventually let us down; we agree that…

  • Born Bad Seeds: Gross Pointe

      Be it from age or simple cosmic awareness, somewhere along the path we become less a reflection of the external, our own tiny voices finding strength in some collective subconscious of US, we close our eyes in true Jordan Catalano fashion to open them with a rift unfathomable between what we have become and the slate grey existence we have given every last ounce of energy not to digress into.   I’m not an idealist, I’m certainly not delusional, there is nothing “original” to our place in this time; not you, not me, and certainly not US. Socrates took that first sip of hemlock as Kerouac railed on about…

  • Calling Out – EZTV

      Here we have the number one album of summer. Not THE summer… just summer. If a single season can have a soundtrack, this is it.   Color me impressed as hell with this debut by Brooklyn trio EZTV. Who do I hear behind this band? I find Dire Straits in their riffs. Seriously, these are some fantastic and yet subtle enough works from the lead guitar. In their laid-back, beachy attitude, I hear Cayucas (these two are cousins at best though). I hear the Shins, in that EZTV is able to satisfy that Shins-esque tiptoe between easy-going and upbeat. But most of all, I hear the Kinks. EZTV captures…

  • Album Review: Lady Lamb’s “After”

      For Lady Lamb (real name, Aly Spaltro), her sophomore album After is about growing up, seeing the positives, and moving forward. When Spaltro released her debut album Ripely Pine, she was going by the name Lady Lamb the Beekeeper and writing about pain and young sadness.  She may still write about pain but she’s reached a place of acceptance and found a much more controlled and powerful sound. Spaltro’s voice is reminiscent to me of Janis Joplin’s emotion and force. She strains her voice with such passion and beauty and sings like she has a lifetime full of stories and experiences but she’s only 25. There’s a distinct difference…

  • The Great Game Review: An Aural Experimentation Debut

      With The Great Game’s members spanning from around the globe, the seven piece band successfully interweaves an array of musical genres that can best be described as “new world music”; taking timeless aspects of various musical styles and bringing them together to create something new and cohesive. The Great Game draws influences from bands like A Perfect Circle and King Crimson, but ultimately each member adds personal strength through vocal, lyrical and instrumental precision. On their opening track, “Science”, Chamberlain blends in the sound of his accordion with Sarraf’s distorted jazz guitar, tapping unfounded boundaries by merging instrumental experimentation with the unpredictability of the future (“Is this the age…

  • Jen Hingley’s “Autonomy”: An Album of One’s Own

      Autonomy: (noun; Independence or freedom, as of the will or one’s actions) – an appropriate name for Jen Hingley’s most recent and entirely self-produced and self-recorded album. Hailing from Manchester, UK, Hingley has her hands in many artistic projects ranging from print and web layout design to photography and film. It would seem that this poly-artistic approach to creation has given Hingley the ability to fully grasp a conceptual idea from different artistic perspectives and communicate it effectively through her music. Along with songs titled “There’s No One Left” and “Solo”, you get the sensation that it is as much about the process of working by yourself as it…

  • Single Review: Troy Samuela and Monsoonsiren’s “Fiend”

      In general, I don’t care for electronic music. But every now and then I’m enticed by the dramatic drops, distorted vocals, and hauntingly catchy beats that define some of today’s better electro-pop. Troy Samuela and Monsoonsiren’s freaky-awesome “Fiend” is one such example – and I can’t get it out of my head. “Fiend” is the first single from new music and art outlet Foreign Family Collective, which is spearheaded by electronic duo ODESZA (you may have heard of them, seeing as they’re the darlings of this year’s festival season). It’s an unusual collaboration between two artists who have both worked with ODESZA but have strikingly different sounds. Monsoonsiren’s take…

  • Review: Ryley Walker’s “Sweet Satisfaction”

      When I typed Ryley Walker’s name into Google for a little context before writing this review, the first thing that came up was an NPR Music writeup about Walker’s latest album, Primrose Green. Its author praises Walker’s use of acoustic-electric guitar riffs to create an unplugged sound that’s more punk rock than coffee shop. He undoubtedly likes Walker’s sound. As a public radio fangirl, I am generally inclined to agree with NPR. As a human being with functioning ears, I am most definitely inclined to really like this song. There are thousands of talented, acoustic guitar-toting singer-songwriters out there, but to be perfectly frank, a great many of them…

  • Iron and Wine: A Glimpse into the Past and the Future

      It’s a refreshing insight into a musician’s growth as an artist and human being when you go back and listen to some of their first recordings. We’re blessed to experience Samuel Beam’s, aka Iron and Wine’s, first musings of what was to become a long and fruitful music career with the release of the Iron and Wine Archives Series Volume No. 1; a collection of songs recorded roughly around the same time as his first album The Creek Drank the Cradle, released in 2002. There is a hum of static that flickers quietly in the corners of the four track cassette recordings like a candle in a cabin at…

  • No You Can’t Have This Track: Grimes – REALiTi

      In case you haven’t heard yet, Grimes’ most recent album was scrapped. Yes, the one with ‘Go’ on it. When asked why, Grimes told that the album just felt “depressing”, though I think it may have had more to do with bad reaction to the single ‘Go’ featuring Blood Diamonds. While not a bad song, ‘Go’ seemed to give off the feeling that any relevant electronic artist could have created the track. It had the Grimes feel, but not enough of it. Even though she scrapped it, we’ve been fortunate to hear more from the ‘lost’ album. ‘REALiTi’ does that which ‘Go’ did not. It has a classic Grimes…

  • Unknown Mortal Orchestra’s “Multi-Love”

      Unknown Mortal Orchestra’s new album, Multi-Love, set to be released on May 26th, has already garnered much positive attention. Frontman and multi-instrumentalist Ruban Nielson concocts a new spin on love – what happens with three individuals join together and the complications that inevitably ensue. Nielson aims to create a sound he can call his very own, experimenting with added dimensions and synths. “It felt good to be rebelling against the typical view of what an artist is today, a curator…. it’s more about being someone who makes things happen in concrete ways. Building old synthesizers and bringing them back to life, creating sounds that aren’t quite like anyone else’s.…

  • Omega Vague’s ‘Reveries’

      Seems like everyone and their grandma is a musician these days. In a world of beats made on laptops and “help me record my debut album!” Kickstarters, it’s easy to miss truly good self-recorded/produced music while you’re trying to avoid all the “experimental” garbage out there. Luckily, I’ve got a pretty solid homemade-ish album for y’all, straight outta Connecticut – Omega Vague’s Reveries.   Omega Vague is Craig Douglas, who’s something of a jack-of-all-trades music-wise. Although he enlisted some help for post-production and drums (all credits can be found on Omega Vague’s website), Douglas says he wrote, performed and recorded Reveries on his own. But he’s not just another…

  • Seashells: A Short in Beauty and Nostalgia

      Although no one’s experience is identical to another, I think we can all agree that growing up is hella weird. And sometimes sad, embarrassing, and confusing. But in looking back upon the saddest, most embarrassing, and most confusing times, you realize that these once Earth-shattering moments are really just blips in a life that came to be full of all sorts of sad, embarrassing and confusing things (plus some good stuff too). When you’re a grown-up, or at least a little closer to becoming one, it’s hard to remember how you felt when you realized that your days of playing with Barbies and drinking Kool-Aid with your friends after…

  • My Top Five Recent Albums

    Ruins by Grouper Grouper’s newly released album Ruins will undoubtebly give you chills at one point or another throughout the eight track record. The album features a mix of dark, soul wrenching songs that are bound to draw emotion out of the listener. Ruins‘ first single “Call Across Rooms” may be the most soul wrenching of all songs on the record, leaving the listener with a dark feeling of solidarity.     Faith In Strangers by Andy Stott Andy Stott’s new album takes the listener on an industrial electronic journey similar to his last record Luxury Problems. The result is another pleasing and unique album, with even more audible experimental…

  • Steve Gunn Presents: Way Out Weather

    Steve Gunn’s Way Out Weather starts with a title track that makes the album sound like a typical Americana album with soaring steel-guitar style playing and finger picked acoustic. During my fourth listen, I began to truly appreciate the wealth of musical information and depth that a few tracks from this album provide. Wildwood, the second track, freshens things up with an occasional 7/4 meter, which is somehow as smooth as it is jarring. Generally, Gunn’s guitar work is ethereal and free, almost as if he’s playing a sitar rather than a guitar. Repetition is a huge part of this album, which can be viewed as a negative at times…

  • Foxygen Freak Out

    F O X Y G E N …and Star Power TL;DR  So I listened to Foxygen’s new album, and then listened to it again stoned.  F I R S T   T I M E   A R O U N D Sophomore albums can be a big hurdle for any band. In Foxygen’s case, there was worry that there wouldn’t even be a sophomore. Thank your respective gods (mine is Bowie) that they were able to work their shit out, because Foxygen has a fucking hit. In 21st Century Ambassadors, Foxygen took us through a whimsical early 60’s. It was all very flower power and love and peace. Great…

  • A Weekend At UTOPiAfest

      Festivals are everywhere, every weekend, for every type of personality. There are music festivals, art festivals, food festivals, and everything in between. If you have a favorite past time, there’s probably a festival dedicated to it. I’ve attended the larger festivals numerous times and while they offer attendees the chance to see some of music’s biggest names mixed with up and coming artists, they also are a great source of stress. To get from one main stage to the other is an odyssey-sized journey. Then you have to make the hardest decisions all weekend. Who do you see? Who do you not see and regret it later? Where do…

  • Wildcat Apollo Presents: KC Zombie

    Fresh off the road from 2014’s Vans Warped Tour after winning Best Rock Song for The John Lennon Songwriting Contest, Wildcat Apollo certainly has a promising future ahead of them. Members Alex Margolin, Cat Tassini, and brothers Aaron and Taylor Eichensee made their way to Austin, Texas in 2013 to record their debut, self-titled album, which was released in October of last year. The band relocated permanently to the city in early 2014. “KC Zombie” is a wonderful mix of dreamy, psychedelic-pop infused with luscious spanning scenes of vintage models and decor. What starts as a glimpse into a fantasy world between four walls spirals into a horrific nightmare, all…

  • Friday the 13th Movie Marathon

    Friday the 13th, though a controversial day, is widely regarded by all. The day itself has only recently been coined as unlucky, with its origins being in the 19th century. With number twelve being seen as the embodiment of perfection (twelve months in a year, hours on a clock, number of Jesus’ disciples, etc.), thirteen represented irregularity and became the redheaded stepchild in the number line. With liberties taken along the years, Friday the 13th is now regarded with blood, guts, gore, and fear as much as Halloween. With October being a few months away, have no fear – you’ll be able to satiate your fright fest fix this coming…

  • Tomboy Presents: Roll Out

    Tomboy, an electro-pop duo with members Sarah Aument and William Shore, is the best thing to come out of NYC this year. It’s been three weeks since the debut of Tomboy’s “Roll Out,” and its already made its way to one of Flavorwire’s top five singles of the week—and there’s reason for that. “Roll Out” is a tribal-infused journey in which you find yourself intoxicated by Aument’s vocals between each beat transition. From slow and melodic to a bumpy ride on an undertone bass, the song sounds like the sexier, mellowed-out version of “Latch.” But it gets better. “Hang Out” is another Tomboy track that you can’t help but listen…

  • Movies To Die For: Teenage

    When I first read up on the root of Matt Wolf’s new flick, “Teenage,” I wasn’t convinced. What do you mean “the development of the teenager?” Teenagers have always been around… An entire phase of life didn’t just come out of nowhere. But, once I started the film, (curled on the couch with a glass of vino) I was pleasantly surprised. The movie ‘Teenage’ was originally inspired by punk author, Jon Savage, and his book Teenage, which is filled with enthralling stores of teenage life never before heard and biographies of youth revolutionaries. However, these stories weren’t of the teen rebels we’ve all heard about like the hippies and the punks;…

  • Kate Moss x Topshop: Glitter, Feathers, and Fringe…Oh My!

    Kate Moss collaborated with Topshop, AGAIN. But she’s come back with designs that are somehow better than last time (is that even possible?). We’ve gone through all of the pieces and hand picked our absolute favorites…and let me tell you, there’s a lot. Kate Moss x Topshop from ANON Magazine on Vimeo. Photo Source  

  • Prides Presents: The Seeds You Sow

    Innovative and infectious synthpop trio, Prides, will release “The Seeds You Sow” 7″ and digital single on March 18 in the U.S. The band just released a new video for “The Seeds You Sow,” which is available to post and share via YouTube. Earlier this month, The Line Of Best Fit premiered the track, which is also available to stream via SoundCloud. Prides just announced a spring tour that will include performances at the SXSW Music Festival as well as major U.S. cities, including New York, Philadelphia, Boston, and Washington, D.C.  The Glasgow based band of three, Prides, formed in 2013 out of the ashes of several local bands. They premiered on the internet last summer with their track “Out of…

  • The Best Films of 2013

    In a year with Scorsese and Coen, David O. Russell reigns supreme. Overall, 2013 killed it. What was one of the best years for rap and hip hop was also a stellar year in film. Dominated by everyone’s #WomanCrushWednesday – Jennifer Lawrence, this year’s film selection is sure to create some tension and unpredictability at the Academy Awards. Between another Coen Brothers spectacle and an over the top Scorsese flick, I narrowed a list down to the top 5 movies of 2013 that I had the pleasure of viewing. Let’s go backwards to add a little drama. 5. Gravity Bullock was great, Clooney was just as good, and Cuarón has…

  • Baths Album Review: Obsidian

    If you’ve ever been to SXSW, you know the hell that your feet endure. You walk downtown Austin hurriedly to get to the venue where one of your favorite acts is performing. Then, depending on the venue, you wait in line for a damned long period of time.  You know, venues like Stubb’s BBQ , Emo’s East, and The Mohawk. That said, I was lucky enough to find my way into The Mohawk two days in a row to catch some captivating performances.  The Thermals frontman Hutch Harris hopped off the stage to exchange shoulder-to-shoulder love with the crowd in the pit. I witnessed rising British electronic duo Disclosure perform…

  • Indie Radar: Tera Melos

    Holy Jesus, this math rock band, Tera Melos, is so god damn good.  I have difficulty starting off this article, because this band is seriously unlike anything I’ve ever heard, so I’ll probably just make up for by swearing too much, BECAUSE THEY ARE FUCKING AMAZING. FUCKING. AMAZING.  It’s also summer now, and I don’t want to exert my brain anymore.  I fuckin’ wrecked my finals, and I deserve to not think for a bit. Photo Source Tera Melos are on a technical level that rivals most highly skilled progressive bands, such as Dream Theater and Kayo Dot (who is also quite good, if you want something else to check…

  • Not So Indie Radar: Jeff Rosenstock

    Raise your hand if you are familiar with Jeff Rosenstock. Wait, no… put your hands down, because I can’t see you, like, at all. Shit, this is awkward. Look, the point I’m trying to illustrate is that if I COULD see you, then it’s likely that many of you haven’t raised your hands, which is a travesty, because this man is a legend. There’s a reason I decided not to put this under the Indie Radar label; Rosenstock has been around for ages. It’s not like he’s new on the radar, but it is like the radar missed him almost completely. I have a lot to cover, so, prepare to…

  • The Terror: A New Chapter For The Flaming Lips

    Last month I got to see The Flaming Lips during SXSW in Austin. Being a Lips live show veteran, I ventured to Auditorium Shores expecting balloons, confetti, big-ass hands, lasers, or maybe Wayne riding the big hamster ball on top of the crowd, but instead I received “The Terror”. After being told that we were the biggest crowd in SXSW history, Wayne began to drape long plastic tubes over his body and then strapped a creepy, life-like baby to his left arm. Wayne proceeded to explain to the crowd that they were going to hear and see something new, for the first time, before anyone else, “So if we fuck…

  • Indie Radar – SKATERS

    Quite possibly the greatest thing out of the New York scene since The Strokes, SKATERS capture an addictive, garage-pop sound that fuses elements of punk and indie dreaminess into a glorious combination of sounds. These sounds cannot simply be categorized into just one genre of music. I fell in love with this band during my adventure at SXSW, galavanting about the streets of Austin in search of new music. My journey took me to the Local Natives set at The Mohawk, and, there on the set list, a humble band named SKATERS from New York City. The show really blew me away. The Lead singer, Michael Cummings, swaggered out onto…

  • Indie Radar: Said The Whale

    Like every responsible person 21 and up, I spent my St. Patty’s day getting way too drunk and slurring my words, but the main difference is that I watched the Vancouver-based, Juno-Award winning band, Said the Whale, play a private show in my friend’s (Lincoln) backyard.  Way to boost your indie cred, Lincoln; props bro, props.     Said the Whale is an indie rock band with some folk influence and a little bit of soul who executed their style wonderfully.  There was merely a tarp on which the 5-piece band set up their equipment and the sound system was actually provided by Lincoln himself, but this did not detract…

  • The Mowgli’s – Love’s Not Dead EP

    The Mowgli’s have been taking the folk-indie world by storm  since the release of their EP, “Love’s Not Dead,” back in October. They have especially been captivating the airwaves with their immensely catchy, musical smile of the song “San Francisco,” which has become insanely popular. There’s something about their sound that simply puts a smile on my face. There is something in their music that feels like it’s a conduit for the soul, very similar to what John Lennon had in his music. Whatever it is, “Love’s Not Dead” is definitely something everyone should be a part of. The eight-piece indie group, reigning from California, can really only be described…

  • Indie Radar – Le Trouble

    When it comes to indie music, there are some things that the listener can come to expect. Whether it’s indie-rock or folk, there is a status-quo to music, and a comfortable boundary of tried and not-tried. In many ways, when I hear a new band, I find myself cataloging their sound in my mind, comparing them to the sound of both new and old bands alike. The first time I heard Le Trouble’s daring work, I was stumped. I couldn’t really think of anything that sounded quite like it. There’s just something different, and I can’t quite put my finger on it. The result of a Quebec born guitarist/songwriter and…

  • Tame Impala – Lonerism

    The first time I heard Tame Impala’s debut album, Innerspeaker, I couldn’t believe that they were from this decade. The Australian outfit has managed to resurrect the psychedelic rock of the 60s and 70s, and forge it with the emerging indie-rock genre of our time. Along with this, they have created something truly magical. The sound is something truly unique; sounding much like the bastard child of Pink Floyd and Cream, with dirty, fuzzy, fat guitar tones that I think would even make Jimi Hendrix proud. In October of last year, with the release of Lonerism, Tame Impala has rocketed into a future in the limelight of independent rock. When…

  • The “DRIVE” Soundtrack Is Musical Genius

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