Indie music in today’s culture has gained recognition as well as popularity from music lovers abroad. From the average teen turned Grammy winner Lorde, to the stylistic edge of The 1975, there’s no denying it’s a genre to watch. But one band, London-based Woman’s Hour, has turned the tables on what we see as top of the line music.

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With their foot stomping beats and their indie pop vibes, Woman’s Hour rushes on the scene with more than the jaw dropping performances and sweet melodies that we are all immune to. Woman’s Hour is more than an average band. Not only is their name one to wrap your head around, but their main ambition is to not only entertain their audience but to have an impact on the people when the last song ends.

 

Consisting Fiona Burgess as the front woman, brother William as the guitarist, Nicolas Graves on the bass, and Josh Hunnisett on the keyboard. They are not only one fine group of beautiful people, but they’re melting into one sound that evidently is worth listening to. Behind these good- looking faces is a story deeper than the ocean, one that can reach out and inspire. “In a sense, we feel like the odd ones out,” Fiona says about their musical approach. “It’s quite empowering that we’re doing it as four people, but we’re not part of a bigger collective.” As odd as they may think their music is compared to mainstream, Woman’s Hour is different in the best of sense, which makes it stand out against the indie music backdrop.

Woman's  Hour

Woman’s Hour’s debut album “Conversations” launched on July 15th in the U.S. and July 21st in the U.K. and has gotten a wide array of recognition from a range of publications. The Guardian called it a “refined blend of yearning bedsit indie pop and sleek 80’s soul [which] is meticulously smooth.”

 

“Conversations “ introduces sleek vocals with an edge that ultimately catches your ears, so you can play it in those moments alone on the subway or during those inspiration-seeking ventures with your brush and easel.  When watching the official “Conversations” music video, what starts as a fixation on Fiona and her stunning appearance, switches to the realization that you are in a world inside a world. A place that Woman’s Hour can only exhibit, something rare in music form, a late night mysteriousness meets first date spirits. Needless to say, this album is inevitably on its way to high ranks and reviews.